Definition of “School System”

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34 Comments

by | February 13, 2013 · 7:18 am

34 responses to “Definition of “School System”

  1. ‘Teach them to the test’ is a magnificent turn of phrase I wish I had thought of.

  2. Great poem! The purpose of mass education IS to make us more ‘efficient’ – that is a better, more able part of ‘the system’. Check out Gatto’s book, “Dumbing us Down”. I did a hasty summary of it on powerpoint a while ago, here: http://modwestmuse.wordpress.com/2012/04/30/the-problem-with-modern-schooling :-)

  3. I love this, but waiting for the traditionalists to die off won’t help. Some of them are young, and plan to muck things up for a long time. Look at Michelle Rhee. She won’t be satisfied until school is nothing but a series of tests.

    • J.R.Taylor

      I agree. And it starts with us. Implanenting these ideas to school boards and meetings in the community. Tests are doing nothing but conforming everyone only to let them out into the real world where we need creative thinkers!

      • Tests are crimes against academic freedom, meaning, having teachers using a diversity of methods to try & help learn! I HATE tests. That’s why I’m quitting my very much loved space of pblic education and setting up my own little language school.

  4. stevehi

    Do you think education long ago became indoctrination ?

  5. I’m loving the concept of presenting it as an iPhone screengrab; it’s creative, and it presents a great self-challenge to the issues with technology in the piece.

    • J.R.Taylor

      Thank you! I’m glad you enjoyed it!!!! My whole “definition” series started quite by accident with the screen grab. I was at the gym when “Definition of ‘Tragic'” popped up and I just had to get on the blog. Now it’s just a cool way of doing it! But for this one…I agree. It shows how someone who didn’t have a “industrial” school experience can create something interesting and cool…not to toot my own horn…=?

  6. There was no mass education long ago, mass education was born with the industrial revolution, and it follows the model of mass production..producing masses of follower…it’s goal is not to create free thinkers but obedient efficient workers.

    • J.R.Taylor

      That’s very true! We just need more people to break from this mode to understand that we have to take risks. People are worried. People are scared of the things that the 90’s generation and beyond can do. I mean look at two year olds working smartphones and tablets. These kids already know they can look up whatever they need right online.
      At 2!
      Dictionaries?
      History lessons?
      English lessons?
      Math lessons?
      All of that and more is all right at their finger tips. It’s on our hips at all times! I’m not saying these aren’t important but not necessary in class rooms. Sure maybe the basics but…things are changing an evolving with us. Just look at Pluto. When I was growing up it was a planet. Now? It’s a moon.
      With moons.

      • That’s so true. That’s why textbooks strangle me. And that’s why it’s a crime to make teachers use textbooks, ignoring (what in Spain is) the Constitutional right of academic freedom. Funny laws protect us but the social pressure of Inspectors and the obedient unthinking majority ignore them! :D

    • I thought they mentioned “indoctrination”, not “mass education”… ? Got it wrong?

      • Mass education has often been equated with indoctination of the masses, they’ve become synonyms in a way…I think that a person who is really very interesting to listen to and read when we’re speaking of the future of education is Sir Ken Robinson and the TED group offers a lot of wonderful ideas…

  7. Based on this post, I think I love you. I agree with Bastet (above), and I think it’s time for a big, fat change. I also love this TED Talk, which you might find interesting: http://www.ted.com/talks/ken_robinson_changing_education_paradigms.htmlThanks for stopping by Being June and for leading me here.

    • J.R.Taylor

      Not a problem! Glad we stumbled upon your blog! And that was fantastic link to share. Thank you! It speaks so much truth and conveys what I was trying to simplify in my poem. Sir Ken is awesome!

  8. Thank you for visiting my blog!
    Also, I had a good laugh out of this.
    I too, am a teacher myself, and hope that I can be a part of the big change in our society’s education system one day! I’ll be looking forward to more of your work : )

  9. I’m afraid the traditionalists are what is needed–not the ones of which you write, however–those who once taught by means of illuminating real books rather than textbooks–which contain little more than survey material.

    Although, to the matter of textbooks: I came into possession of a now 130 year old “Appleton’s” designed for forth year students–who would be some 9 years of age. It was, in fact a survey work, just as any modern composition text might be. (Such things were devised to allow less qualified people to teach–frontier situations, for example, very well intended) However it is more sophisticated, and demanded more thought in follow-up questions and proposed projects and assignments than did a similar book I have which was published in the mid 1980ies. I am not exaggerating as I write this. The reading selections therein were much more demanding, the questions afterwards were similar, but required much more thoughtfulness and much greater understanding.

    I shudder to think what such a book would look like in 2013. I did have an experience with such a book in, I believe it was, 1998, and the degradation even from the 1980ies book was severe. It even had little cartoon drawings interspersed throughout in order to keep the college sophomores’ attention. The reading was of a character far less than the Appleton’s by far.

    I am not a teacher, however I do know two excellent ones who reluctantly left the field and have gone on to private teaching. We have spoken much about such things, and they would, no doubt tell you the same as I.

    What, I wonder, would the scholars writing for Appleton’s130 years ago think if they knew how well they had succeeded in the longterm in the way of enabling the unqualified to teach?

  10. Pingback: Definition of “School System” | Words Of Birds | David Emeron: Reflections upon Reflections

  11. Oh dear, I’m a teacher and I’m saddened that I’ve been lumped in with your sentiments. Believe me, there are rainbows of instruction in the gloom of mediocrity out there. Anyway, thanks for the follow. I will stop back for your other posts. Like the iphone screen shot poem format-clever.

  12. Pingback: Definition of “School System” | Words Of Birds | David Emeron: Sonnet Blog

  13. Pingback: Definition of “School System” | Words Of Birds | David Emeron: Sonnets

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